Proclamations

Print
Press Enter to show all options, press Tab go to next option

 

Mayor O’Dekirk is honored to issue proclamations to recognize individuals, groups, milestones, achievements or events for their unique contributions to City of Joliet. Proclamations are issued to honor exceptional achievement or actions within the community.

Proclamations may be presented to an organization at a City Council meeting or picked up at the Mayor’s Office. There is a limit of two proclamations per City Council meeting.

To be presented at a City Council meeting, proclamations must have a local significance. Proclamations noting national days or months of celebration or honor must tie directly to an organization with a physical presence in Joliet.

Proclamation requests must meet the following guidelines:

  • Requests must be made to the Mayor’s Office four weeks in advance of date needed.
  • The Mayor's Office only fulfills requests from in-state organizations. If a national organization wishes to request a proclamation, please find an affiliate or sponsor located within Joliet.
  • Organizations are limited to two proclamation requests within the same calendar year – please prioritize your requests.
  • Requestor must propose language (at least 6 WHEREAS clauses) to be used for proclamation; however, the Mayor’s office reserves the right to modify any proposed language.

Please note, proclamations are typically not provided for the following:

  • anniversaries of individuals or businesses;
  • specific individual achievements (note: individuals who have made extraordinary contributions to Joliet will be given special consideration);
  • to honor private businesses, conferences, grand openings, fundraisers, or to act as a letter of support or endorsement of individual people, products, or services.

There is a limit of one proclamation per year for each subject or individual. All submissions will be reviewed and edited as necessary. The Mayor’s Office reserves the right to decline any request for a proclamation, as well as the right to make exceptions to the guideline procedures. Proclamations are not legally binding, nor do they constitute an endorsement by the Mayor.