Raynor's Addition

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Development of the Raynor's Addition Local District | Legal Description

Development of the Raynor's Addition Local District

On March 15, 1999, members of the Joliet Historic Preservation Commission were invited to the home of Tom and Jan Quillman, 813 Western Avenue. The Quillmans had invited all other residents of the 800 block of Western, the Rev. Craig Herr of the First Presbyterian Church, and Timothy Brophy, City Councilman for the 800 block, to their house for the evening as well. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the pros and cons of establishing a local historic district for the 800 block of Western Avenue. Mark Baker, Chairman of the HPC, opened with a short presentation of how a local district works, and why the HPC thinks the 800 block would benefit by establishing one. Bob Nachtrieb recounted the experience of the 600 block, and discussed some of the misconceptions and objections raised by some residents of that block. The HPC questionnaire was distributed to the eight residents present and to Rev. Herr. Six questionnaires were completed and returned that evening; Bob Nachtrieb followed up with the two residents who took their questionnaires home, and with the one resident who did not attend the meeting. In all three cases the residents expressed interest in and willingness to join a local historic district.

All nine residential households indicated positive interest in a local district. A tenth residential property, 816 Western, has been vacant for several years and has been repossessed by the Department of Housing and Urban Development. The Rev. Herr has conferred with First Presbyterian’s governing board on the matter of the church joining a local historic district. He reports the board is favorably disposed to join the district.
In short, the residents of the 800 block are unanimous in support of a local historic district, and the First Presbyterian Church likewise favors joining the district.

All nine residents are the owners of their properties.